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Teaching Ethics to Computer Science and Engineering Students – Experiences, Current Issues and Future Challenges

Save the date! On September 22nd, the Ethics4EU Project will organize a workshop on Teaching Ethics to Computer Science and Engineering Students – Experiences, Current Issues and Future Challenges.

The event, organized by Chalmers University of Technology, will include contributions from experts in teaching Digital Ethics to Computer Science and Engineering students and a workshop to share experiences and ideas for the future.

Participants will be given access to newly designed resources to facilitate them in teaching ethics in their CS and engineering modules.

WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE?

If you’re working in Higher Education, either as a lecturer, professor, researcher, or PhD student, and have an interest in Digital Ethics, this event is for you! If you are thinking of introducing Digital Ethics lectures in your modules/courses, this event will give you insights on how to do access open source resources for your courses and modules. You’ll have a chance to meet and network with researchers and lecturers across Europe who aim at introducing Digital Ethics in Computer Science Higher Education programmes and have a privileged access to our Community of Practice!

This event might also be of interest to students in Computer Science Faculties that feel Digital Ethics should be introduced in their courses or that wish to understand its importance.

Any questions? Get in touch with us at ethics4eu@gmail.com


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS



Dr. Viola Schiaffonati
is associate professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science at Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria. She holds a PhD in Philosophy of Science from Università di Genova. She has been visiting scholar at the Department of Philosophy of the University of California at Berkeley and visiting researcher at the Suppes Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Science and Technology of the Stanford University. She teaches Computer Ethics, Philosophical Issues of Computer Science, Bioethics, Ethics Seminar.

Get in touch!

Dr. Karl de Fine Licht, a PhD in Practical Philosophy, is Senior Lecturer in Ethics and Technology at Chalmers University of Technology and is currently engaged in course development and training of teachers in the field of ethics and engineering. He also holds courses on the intermediate and advanced levels on the same subject. His research is mainly about social sustainability in urban development and artificial intelligence in public decision-making. Before he received his permanent position at Chalmers, Karl had a permanent position as researcher and project manager at the Research Institutes of Sweden (RISE), as well as a teacher and a researcher at University of Gothenburg, Uppsala university, and KTH Royal institute of Technology in Stockholm.

Get in touch!

AGENDA

12:00 Ireland / 13:00 CEST – Welcome  Dympna O’Sullivan (TU Dublin), Paul Gibson & Stephane Maag (Télécom SudParis)

The welcoming section will include a demo of our open access resources for including Digital Ethics modules in Computer Science and Engineering programmes.

12:30 Ireland / 13:30 CEST – Why and how teaching ethics to CS and engineering students: current issues and future challenges – Dr. Viola Schiaffonati (Politecnico di Milano)

By presenting some experiences in teaching ethics to engineering students at Politecnico di Milano, Viola will focus on the issues and challenges of integrating humanities and social sciences in the scientific and engineering curricula.

13:00 Ireland / 14:00 CEST – Teaching ethics to teachers and engineering students: some reflections on the upshots and downsides when walking a tightrope between puzzle-solving and despair – Dr. Karl de Fine Licht (Chalmers University of Technology)

In this talk Karl will share some of their experiences from teaching ethics to teachers as well as students in a wide range of contexts. Karl will provide both concrete examples on what they do when they teach, as well as describe the challenges they have met, and to some extent how they have dealt with them.

13:30 Ireland / 14:30 CEST – Coffee Break

TEACHING ETHICS TO COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING STUDENTS – EXPERIENCES FROM SWEDISH UNIVERSITY CONTEXT

13:40 Ireland / 14:40 CEST – Teaching a Course on New Technologies, Global Risk and the Future of Humanity – Olle Häggström (Chalmers University of Technology)

Every year since 2015, Olle has given the course “New Technologies, Global Risk and the Future of Humanity” at Chalmers University of Technology. The course is project-centered and aimed at prompting the students to think seriously about major challenges facing humanity in relation to emerging and future technologies in biotech, nanotech, AI and other areas. A key aspect to make the course successful is to help the students integrate science and engineering aspects with ethics and the analysis of social consequences, and Olle will sketch how they go about this task.

13:55 Ireland / 14:55 CEST – AI Ethics Through Fiction – Kathryn Strong Hansen (Chalmers University of Technology)

Kathryn has served as an instructor for an interdisciplinary course that uses fiction to discuss ethical issues with AI and other technological developments here at Chalmers. The talk Kathryn will give provides an overview of this course, explaining why fiction is beneficial as a springboard for ethical discussion and reflection. The talk will also include suggestions of literary, filmic, and televisual fictions that raise real and speculative ethical issues with AI.

14:10 Ireland / 15:10 CEST – Applied Machine Learning: Machine Learning and Ethics – Vilhelm Verendel (Chalmers University of Technology)

For a few years now, Vilhelm has helped teaching ideas from ethics to engineering students with CS as well as other backgrounds. Vilhelm will share a few lessons learned, including how to rapidly show students how different ethical perspectives can be, how to get discussions started, and bridging abstract philosophical ideas with practical problems.

14:25 Ireland / 15:25 CEST – Learning from Teaching Ethics at Mälardalen University and Chalmers University of Technology – Gordana Dodig Crnkovic (Chalmers University of Technology and Mälardalen University)

During more than twenty years, starting 2001 at Mälardalen University, Gordana has been teaching students of Computer Science, Engineering, Interaction Design and occasionally Economics in courses “Professional ethics” at Mälardalen University (Bachelor, Master and PhD levels) (2001-2014), and “Research Ethics and Sustainable Development” at Chalmers University of Technology (PhD level) 2014-2017. During the years Gordana had regular guest lectures in Professional Ethics, Ethics of Computing, Ethics of AI, Design Ethics, Ethics for Cognitive Scientists, Robotic Ethics and Ethics of Autonomous Cars. In this talk Gordana will present lessons learned, illustrated by concrete examples from my courses, sketching briefly future possibilities, anticipations and hopes for further developments.

14:40 Ireland / 15:40 CEST – Coffee Break

14:50 Ireland / 15:50 CEST – Workshop

15:20 Ireland / 16:20 CEST – Conclusion with highlights from the workshop

16:00 Ireland / 17:00 CEST – End of the event

Dealing with the Complexities of Teaching Ethics to Future Computing Professionals – VIDEOS

You didn’t get to participate in the Ethics4EU Online Event on 22 April?

Dealing with the Complexities of Teaching Ethics to Future Computing Professionals is available below!

 

WHO SHOULD WATCH THIS?

If you’re working in Higher Education, either as a lecturer, professor, researcher, or PhD student, and have an interest in Digital Ethics, these videos are for you!

If you are thinking of introducing Digital Ethics lectures in your modules/courses, these recordings will give you insights on how to do access open source resources for your courses and modules. You’ll have a chance to hear from researchers and lecturers across Europe who aim at introducing Digital Ethics in Computer Science Higher Education programmes and have a privileged access to our Community of Practice!

This event might also be of interest to students in Computer Science Faculties that feel Digital Ethics should be introduced in their courses or that wish to understand its importance.

Part 1

Part 2

Dark Patterns – How online organisations design to influence our behaviour



As part of Tech Week 2021 Andrea Curley, Lecturer at Technological University Dublin, will show us how ‘Dark Patterns‘ are an increasingly common occurrence on digital platforms including social media sites, shopping websites, mobile apps, and video games. At best, dark patterns annoy and frustrate users. At worst, they can mislead and deceive users, e.g., by causing financial loss, tricking users into giving up vast amounts of personal data, or inducing compulsive and addictive behaviour in adults and children.

Andrea Curley been a lecturer in the School of Computer Science in TU Dublin (Technological University Dublin) for over 15 years teaching modules in areas such as UX (User Experience) and Human Computer Interaction (HCI).

Dealing with the Complexities of Teaching Ethics to Future CS Professionals – Event

There will be Ethics4EU Online Event on 22 April 2021, 09:00 – 12:00 CEST, with the main theme “Dealing with the Complexities of Teaching Ethics to Future Computing Professionals”.

The event will be organized by Informatics Europe. The free event will be held via Zoom (registration is required). It will include prominent speakers and a discussion panel including experts in Ethics, academics, and professionals working in areas, roles or projects where ethical or legal aspects take the central stage. A  great change to network with people working or interested in Digital Ethics!


AGENDA

9:00 – 09:05 – Welcome

09:05 – 09:40 – Dympna O’Sullivan, TU Dublin, Ireland (“Ethics4 EU Project”) – 20 min Talk followed by 15 min Q&A

09:40 – 10:15 – Michele Loi, Institute of Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland – 20 min Talk followed by 15 min Q&A

10:15 – 10:35 – Break

10:35 – 11:10 – Julia Amann, Health Ethics and Policy Lab, ETH Zurich, Switzerland – 20 min Talk followed by 15 min Q&A

11:10 – 11:55 – Discussion Panel on “Dealing with the Complexities of Teaching Ethics to Future Computing Professionals“. Chair: Viola Schiaffonati (Politecnico di Milano, Italy). Panellists: Andrea Curley (TU Dublin, Ireland) Ireland Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (Mälardalen University & Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden) J. Paul Gibson ( Institute Mines-Télécom, France) Damian Gordon (TU Dublin, Ireland)

11:55 – 12:00 – Conclusion


WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE?

If you’re working in Higher Education, either as a lecturer, professor, researcher, or PhD student, and have an interest in Digital Ethics, this event is for you! If you are thinking of introducing Digital Ethics lectures in your modules/courses, this event will give you insights on how to do access open source resources for your courses and modules. You’ll have a chance to meet and network with researchers and lecturers across Europe who aim at introducing Digital Ethics in Computer Science Higher Education programmes and have a privileged access to our Community of Practice!

This event might also be of interest to students in Computer Science Faculties that feel Digital Ethics should be introduced in their courses or that wish to understand its importance.

For more information contact: administration@informatics-europe.org or ethics4eu@gmail.com

Digital Ethics: Can we do better? – Workshop

On the 15th of June, Institut Mines-Télécom/Télécom SudParis will host an online workshop on Digital Ethics.

The programme is yet to be confirmed, but will include presentations from researchers, teachers, journalists, politicians and industry professionals to discuss the topic “Can we do better in Digital Ethics?

The workshop will also include a poster presentation by students from different European Universities.

The link for registering to the event will soon be available at this page!

WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE?

If you’re working in Higher Education, either as a lecturer, professor, researcher, or PhD student, and have an interest in Digital Ethics, this event is for you! If you are thinking of introducing Digital Ethics lectures in your modules/courses, this event will give you insights on how to do it in a pragmatic, case study based way

The workshop might also be of interest to students in Computer Science Faculties that feel Digital Ethics should be introduced in their courses or that wish to understand its importance.


The speakers

Dr. Alessandra Bagnato is a research scientist and the Head of Modelio Research Unit in Softeam Software (Docaposte Group). She holds a Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from Télécom SudParis and Université Evry Val d’Essonne, France and a MSc in Computer Science from the University of Genoa, Italy. At SOFTEAM, she leads the Softeam Software Modelio team research activities around innovative model-driven engineering methods in Modelio workbench in the area of Cyber-Physical Systems, Cloud and Big Data (like ECSEL AIDOaRt, H2020 MORPHEMIC, H2020 Databio, H2020 CPSwarm, H2020 QRapids, H2020 CROSSMINER), GDPR and Privacy (H2020 PoSeID-on) and on measuring software engineering (ITEA 3 MEASURE).

Jim Dratwa’s research and publications address the interconnections between knowledge, values and action. He has served in several positions of responsibility in that regard at the European Commission, as member of BEPA (the Bureau of European Policy Advisers to the President), at the EPSC (the European Political Strategy Centre) and in the Directorate-General for Research and Innovation. At the European Commission he heads the team tasked with Ethics in Science and New Technologies also in charge of the EGE (the European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies), he is the Secretary-General of the EC International Dialogue on Ethics and Bioethics, and the EC representative in the international organisations dealing with the ethics and governance of new technologies. He holds degrees in physics, philosophy, politics and the life sciences, received the Fulbright Scholar Award, was Harvard Boas Fellow, Ramón y Cajal Scholar, and was pre- and post-doctoral Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School of Government, in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, with the program on Science, Technology, and Society. He has taught at the Ecole des Mines de Paris, Sciences Po Paris, Harvard University, and the universities of Brussels, where he is currently based. It is under the Obama administration that he was made Global Fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center, with fellows chosen based on their record achievements as authorities in their field. He is also Distinguished Scholar in Philosophy and in Science and Technologies Studies with the Free University of Brussels (VUB). Jim Dratwa is also an award-winning game designer and author. His latest game, Robby One, on human-machine relations and human-human relations, is out now. His latest book, What world do we want to live in together?, yes that really is what it’s about, is now out in French and coming out in English this winter.

Fatiha Zaïdi received the PhD degree in Computer Science from the University of Evry, France, in 2001, and the Habilitation degree in computer Science from Paris Sud University, France, in 2010. Since 2003, she is an associated professor at Paris Sud University (newly renamed Paris Saclay University). She has been the Ph.D. advisor of more than 10 Ph.D students. Her research activities address formal methods in the software development cycle and in particular model-based testing, runtime verification, attack tolerance framework and parameterized model checking for concurrent and distributed systems. She has developed passive monitoring technique to test centralized and distributed systems. She has been and she is still involved in research projects funded by the National French Agency and also European projects. She served as Program Committee member of high ranked conferences. She has also organised several conferences.

 

Thomas Baudel is research director at the IBM France development laboratory, and a member of the STIC doctoral college of University Paris-Saclay. Besides his work in Human-Computer Interaction for decision engineering, he teaches the class on Research Integrity, Research Ethics and Information Ethics for the doctoral school, which is now made available as an online MOOC: https://www.fun-mooc.fr/fr/cours/ethics-stics-scientific-integrity-research-ethics-information-et/ and has certified over 2000 students over the past few years.


AGENDA

All times CET

14:00 Welcome Paul Gibson & Stephane Maag (Télécom SudParis) & Dympna O’Sullivan (TU Dublin)

14:15 New Frontiers in decision engineering: Information Ethics as an engineering discipline – Dr. Thomas Baudel (IBM)

We present the motivation, design, outline and lessons learned from an online course in scientific integrity, research ethics and information ethics provided to over 2000 doctoral and engineering students in STEM fields, first at the University Paris-Saclay, and now expanded to an online MOOC available to students across the world, in English. Unlike a course in scientific domains, meant to provide students with methods, tools and concepts they can apply in their future career, the goal of such a training is not so much to equip them, but to make them aware of the impact of their work on society, care about the responsibilities that befall on them, and make them realize not all share the same opinions on how should technology imprint society. While we provide conceptual tools, this is more to sustain interest and engage students. We want them to debate on concrete ethical issues and realize the difficulty of reconciling positions on contemporary dilemma such as dematerialized intellectual property, freedom of expression online and its counterparts, the protection of our digital selves, the management of algorithmic decision, the control of autonomous systems, and the resolution of the digital divide. As a bold shortcut, our course is about introducing and motivating Hegelian dialectics in STEM curricula, usually more bent on an Aristotelian perspective.

14:35 Teaching Critical-Safety systems considering Digital EthicsDr. Fatiha Zaïdi (University Paris-Saclay)

In this talk, Fatiha will share her experience in teaching and research in formal methods and how ethics are to be considered. For critical-safety systems, how industry have to use formal methods in order to avoid life’s lost and to take into account ethical issues to leverage the efforts in driving formal methods and earn money. In case of attack tolerance systems, how ethical issues have to be considered as the system has to continue to work in presence of an attack. Moreover, in financial systems such as blockchains, how verifying smart contrats can help to avoid financial losts due to a flaw which can conduct to vulnerability. Is it ethical to earn money because of a flaw? Can we consider that in this case we are facing an attack?

15:00 Coffee break

15:15 What world do we want to live in together? Ethics of Artificial Intelligence and the Question of Europe – Dr. Jim Dratwa (European Commission)

Developing key themes of his latest book on Digital Ethics, Professor Jim Dratwa will take us on a collective thought experiment to unpack the twin transitions of ‘Green’ and ‘Digital’ in our context.

15:35 Digital Ethics in H2020 projects preparationDr. Alessandra Bagnato (Softeam)

For all activities funded by the European Union, Digital Ethics is an integral part of research from beginning to end.  The talk will go through the different aspects to be taken into consideration from the conceptual stage of a project proposal through the whole project lifetime with examples from running projects.

16:15 Panel and Q&A – Dr. Fatiha Zaïdi, Dr. Thomas Baudel, Dr. Alessandra Bagnato, Dr. Dympna O’Sullivan, Dr. Jim Dratwa, Dr. Emma Murphy (TU Dublin)

16:35 Presentation of students’ posters

16:50 Voting for the best posters and winners announcement

17:00 End of the event


ARE YOU A STUDENT?

If you are an undergraduate, graduate or postgraduate student, you are invited to submit a poster under the broad theme of “Digital Ethics: can we do better?”.

Download the competition rules and download the poster template in the download section below.

 

 

Third Milestone Meeting

On the 27th November, Ethics4EU had its third Milestone Meeting!

The event was originally supposed to take place in Milan but was moved online due to the pandemic. Not meeting face-to-face didn’t affect the overall efficacy of the meeting which led us to important milestones!

The Ethics4EU now has many educational resources ready to be tested next semester and a plan for next year’s events.

Behind the Code – Event

LEARNING DATA ETHICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Wednesday 2nd December the Ethics4EU team will run a very special online event on Data Ethics. Four lecturers from two Computer Science Faculties in Ireland and France will introduce you to the ethical implications of data management and how to teach them in Computer Science faculties using a case study driven approach.

WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE?

If you’re working in Higher Education, either as a lecturer, professor, researcher, or PhD student, and have an interest in Digital Ethics, this event is for you! If you are thinking of introducing Digital Ethics lectures in your modules/courses, this event will give you insights on how to do it in a pragmatic, case study based way.

Behind the Code might also be of interest to students in Computer Science Faculties that feel Digital Ethics should be introduced in their courses or that wish to understand its importance.


AGENDA

(ALL TIMES DISPLAYED CET)

2.00 – 2.05: Welcome and registration

2.05 – 2.15: ETHICS4EU project introduction by DLEARN

2:15 – 2:30: Dympna O’ Sullivan [TU Dublin]
Existing Competencies in the Teaching of Ethics in Computer Science Faculties
– A European Survey

2.30 – 3.00: Damian Gordon, Brendan Tierney [TU Dublin]
Ethical implications of data management

3.00 – 3.30: Paul Gibson [Institut Mines-Télécom]
Developing an educational brick for digital ethics – A case study-driven approach

3.30 – 4.00: Q&A

Report sneak peak! – Existing Competencies in the Teaching of Ethics in Computer Science Faculties

Our report on Existing Competencies in the Teaching of Ethics in Computer Science Faculties has been sent to external reviewers and will soon be published!

In the meanwhile, here’s a sneak peak of what we have worked on!

Our has been devised with the goal of better understanding the current landscape of Ethics teaching in Computer Science higher education institutions across Europe. It is of central importance to the project to understand if and how Ethics is currently taught in Computer Science programmes, the background of the teaching staff, the scope of the curricula, the teaching practices and learning methods, assessment and learning outcomes.

Our study builds on a previous investigation from one of the project partners (Informatics Europe) where a selected group of experts from European Universities contributed to a discussion addressing issues like the perceived importance, relevance and possible implementation of the teaching of ethical/social impact of Computer in university degree programmes in this discipline. We extended and amplified that study, surveying more universities and adding more specific questions with the purpose of acquiring a broader understanding of the current practices for the teaching of Ethics in Computer Science across Europe.

Our study started in December 2019 when TU Dublin, together with Informatics Europe and Mälardalen University, developed the first draft of an online questionnaire. In January 2020, the online questionnaire was sent to all members and networking partners of Informatics Europe and European Digital Learning Network (D-Learn) reaching over 150 European Universities from more than 30 European countries.

The survey was structured in three parts. The first part consisted of demographic questions (Section A) answered by all 61 respondents. The rest of the questionnaire was split into two parts based on whether the respondent’s institution teaches Ethics as part of any Computer Science or related programmes. The second part (Section B) was addressed only to those that replied their institutions do not teach Ethics as part of any Computer Science or related programmes, 22 out of 61 respondents. The third part (Section C) was completed by the 39 participants who responded their institutions teaches Ethics as part of any Computer Science or related programmes.

The final goal of our study was to gain a better understanding and some guidelines on how to develop off-the-shelf teaching and assessment content and a Community of Practice that makes it easy for any Computer Science lecturer to deliver lessons on the topic of Digital Ethics.

The full report will be available soon at the outcomes section of the website!
A must-read for any lecturer, professor, head of School/Department that wish to implement or ameliorate the teaching of Ethics in their institution.

5 books on Digital Ethics to read this summer!

Here’s a list of 5 Digital Ethics related books you might want to read this summer! The following readings can be appreciated by all types of audience, including people not working in the IT sector.

Social Media

Behind the Screen: Content Moderation in the Shadows of Social Media
by S. T. Roberts (2019)
 
Social media on the internet can be a nightmarish place. A primary shield against hateful language, violent videos, and online cruelty uploaded by users is not an algorithm. It is people. Mostly invisible by design, more than 100,000 commercial content moderators evaluate posts on mainstream social media platforms: enforcing internal policies, training artificial intelligence systems, and actively screening and removing offensive material—sometimes thousands of items per day.
 
Sarah T. Roberts, an award-winning social media scholar, offers the first extensive ethnographic study of the commercial content moderation industry. Based on interviews with workers from Silicon Valley to the Philippines, at boutique firms and at major social media companies, she contextualizes this hidden industry and examines the emotional toll it takes on its workers. This revealing investigation of the people “behind the screen” offers insights into not only the reality of our commercial internet but the future of globalized labor in the digital age.

The book is available for purchase here: https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300235883/behind-screen.

Data

Data Ethics: The New Competitive Advantage
by G. Hasselbalch and P Tranberg (2016)

Respect for privacy and the individual’s right to control their own data is becoming a key competitive parameter. Companies, organisations and authorities that treat data ethics as a social responsibility as important as environmental awareness and respect for human rights are tomorrow’s winners. Digital trust is paramount for digital growth and welfare.

This book combines broad trend analysis with case studies of companies working with data ethics to varying degrees. The authors make the case how citizens and consumers are no longer just concerned about their lack of control over data, but also have begun to act, and how alternative business models, advances in technology and a new European data protection regulation combined foster a growing market for data ethical products and services. It provides a critical and fresh look at tech trends and the ethical dilemmas intertwined with them. It is a book for responsible players on how to get started with data ethics and how to use it to develop digital trust.

The book is available for free download at https://dataethics.eu/da/book/.


Ethical Reasoning in Big Data: An Exploratory Analysis (Computational Social Sciences)

by J. Collman and S. A. Matei, editors (2016)

This book springs from a multidisciplinary, multi-organizational, and multi-sector conversation about the privacy and ethical implications of research in human affairs using big data. The need to cultivate and enlist the public’s trust in the abilities of particular scientists and scientific institutions constitutes one of this book’s major themes. The advent of the Internet, the mass digitization of research information, and social media brought about, among many other things, the ability to harvest – sometimes implicitly – a wealth of human genomic, biological, behavioral, economic, political, and social data for the purposes of scientific research as well as commerce, government affairs, and social interaction.

What type of ethical dilemmas did such changes generate? How should scientists collect, manipulate, and disseminate this information? The effects of this revolution and its ethical implications are wide-ranging. This book includes the opinions of myriad investigators, practitioners, and stakeholders in big data on human beings who also routinely reflect on the privacy and ethical issues of this phenomenon. Dedicated to the practice of ethical reasoning and reflection in action, the book offers a range of observations, lessons learned, reasoning tools, and suggestions for institutional practice to promote responsible big data research on human affairs.

Find the book in the nearest library


Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy

by Cathy O’Neil (2016)

We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives—where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance—are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: Everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated.

But as Cathy O’Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and uncontestable, even when they’re wrong. Most troubling, they reinforce discrimination: If a poor student can’t get a loan because a lending model deems him too risky (by virtue of his zip code), he’s then cut off from the kind of education that could pull him out of poverty, and a vicious spiral ensues. Models are propping up the lucky and punishing the downtrodden, creating a “toxic cocktail for democracy.” Welcome to the dark side of Big Data.

O’Neil calls on modelers to take more responsibility for their algorithms and on policy makers to regulate their use. But in the end, it’s up to us to become more savvy about the models that govern our lives. This important book empowers us to ask the tough questions, uncover the truth, and demand change.

The book is available for purchase here: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/weapons-of-math-destruction-cathy-oneil/1123130166

AI

Towards a Code of Ethics for Artificial Intelligence
by P. Boddington (2017)

The author investigates how to produce realistic and workable ethical codes or regulations in this rapidly developing field to address the immediate and realistic longer-term issues facing us. She spells out the key ethical debates concisely, exposing all sides of the arguments, and addresses how codes of ethics or other regulations might feasibly be developed, looking for pitfalls and opportunities, drawing on lessons learned in other fields, and explaining key points of professional ethics.

The book provides a useful resource for those aiming to address the ethical challenges of AI research in meaningful and practical ways. 

The book is available for purchase here: https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319606477

Data Ethics Book coming in August 2020!

97 THINGS ABOUT ETHICS EVERYONE IN DATA SCIENCE SHOULD KNOW

Two researchers on the Ethics4EU project, Brendan Tierney (TU Dublin) and Damian Gordon (TU Dublin) have contributed chapters to an upcoming book “97 Things about Ethics Everyone in Data Science Should Know” from O’Reilly Media which will be released in August 2020.

The book is part of a larger series O’Reilly Media does called “97 Things”, each of which contains 97 chapters from a variety of authors on a given topic. This book is a collection designed to represent a wide range of voices and ideas from leading practitioners (industry and academia), from around the world, who have a clear point of view on some aspect of the ethical issues surrounding the field of data science.

The key themes of the book include:

  • What types of data science initiatives can be ethically undertaken
  • How to determine what data can be ethically utilized
  • Monitoring and maintenance needed to ensure a process’s ongoing ethical state
  • How to ensure that the results of a data science initiative are used ethically
  • What policies and procedures are needed to support all of the above

This book helps data professionals, managers, and tech leaders learn powerful, real-world best practices and get a better understanding for data ethics. It provides you with the things you need to know for ethically collecting, managing, and using data.

The book is edited by Bill Franks (the Chief Analytics Officer for ​The International Institute For Analytics) whose website is here: https://bill-franks.com/index.html

It is available for order on Amazon.co.uk and on Amazon.com.